Saturday, 30 November 2013

CATH KIDSTON BRAND & PRINT RESEARCH

After reading the Cath Kidston brief, I researched into the brand aesthetics, in regards to print, idea and concept as well as colour and theme. I found doing this process before writing down initial ideas helped my thought process. Below are screenshots from the website, showing the above points.











DIFFERENT PARENTHETICS

Below are a list of the main Parenthicals used in type, along with their meanings (or  definition) and an example to clarify. I feel this is an important part of research as they are all used in different ways, for different things. This will need to be taken into consideration when designing and generating further ideas.

The Bracket:

( ) [ ]

There are two main types of brackets.
Round brackets
Round brackets (also called parentheses) are mainly used to separate off information that isn’t essential to the meaning of the rest of the sentence. If you removed the bracketed material the sentence would still make perfectly good sense. 
Square brackets 
Square brackets are mainly used to enclose words added by someone other than the original writer or speaker, typically in order to clarify the situation.

The Hashtag:
#
Noun
A word or phrase preceded by a hash sign (#), used on social media sites such as Twitter to identify messages on a specific topic:spammers often broadcast tweets with popular hashtags even if the tweet has nothing to do with them
the hashtag #riotcleanup is being used by community members to coordinate some post-riot street-cleaning.

The hash sign (#):Hunt mistook an @ for a hashtag while tweeting derogatory thoughts about him.

The Dash:
-
Dashes are the least forma. Used for adding additional information to help a reader understand more context.
With the homeless now crowding the streets of cities that once hardly knew them — like Portland, Oregon — Clinton has effectively criminalized the poor.

The Askterisk:
*
noun
A symbol (*) used in text as a pointer to an annotation or footnote.
verb
[with object]
Mark (a word or piece of text) with an asterisk: (as adjective asteriskedasterisked entries.

The Comma:
,
Used to indiciate a pause in type for the viewer reading.

Post-Script:
P.S.
Abbreviation of postscript.
ˈpəʊs(t)skrɪpt/
noun
An additional remark at the end of a letter, after the signature and introduced by ‘PS’.

PARENTHETICALS IN USE

Initially I collected examples of parenthesis is use. I found out that parenthesis isn't shown clearly online in the desired way I envision, as this seems to be an idea not many others, if any have played around with. Below are some examples I did find online showing basic uses and parentheticals.

par·en·thet·ic

 [par-uhn-thet-ik]
adjective
1.
of, pertaining to, noting, or of the nature of a parenthesisseveral unnecessary parenthetic remarks.
2.
characterized by the use of parentheses.
Also, par·en·thet·i·cal.



Well designed definition showing Parenthesis at the same time, with the after thought, i.e. the actual definition being in brackets (a parenthetical) <-- use of Parenthesis!


Common Parentheses - Brackets.



Often used in complex mathematics.


Introduction of the Asterisk.


Clever use of Parenthesis for a promotional poster based on Architectural design.


Parentheses illustration.


An usual way of showing the meaning - conceptual with scaffolding.


Dividing information.

Source: Google Images.


The hash tag is more used now than ever, and is probably the most common type of parenthesis used at the moment as seen in the screenshots of Twitter above and below. Usually adding a trend or cheeky/serious after thought or quick message.

In the message below there are 4 uses of Parenthesis - # (pound) #barcamp and [msg].





The asterisk usually used too add a note or correction after a word. Again an after thought and use of parenthesis.



Used in mechanical diagrams originally.



The Asterisk in use in two very different ways - one for aesthetics one communicating a message, showing how it is used in a hypothetical situation.

Source: Google Images

BRACKETS & PARENTHESIS CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

After re writing the brief, and considering my initial ideas, I looked into brackets below, leading me on to Parenthesis, and the idea of an after thought, which is the concept I plan to use for this brief. I plan to show this through different characters and how this can change tone of voice and meaning through type and content.

Below is the initial research of key words and terminology for Parenthesis and how it is used to clarify for myself, my tutors and the potential user.


Brackets ( ) [ ]


There are two main types of brackets.
Round brackets
Round brackets (also called parentheses) are mainly used to separate off information that isn’t essential to the meaning of the rest of the sentence. If you removed the bracketed material the sentence would still make perfectly good sense. 
Square brackets 
Square brackets are mainly used to enclose words added by someone other than the original writer or speaker, typically in order to clarify the situation.

Parentheses:
noun (plural parentheses /-siːz/)
1. A word or phrase inserted as an explanation or afterthought into a passage which is grammatically complete without it, in writing usually marked off by brackets, dashes, or commas: in a challenging parenthesis, Wordsworth comments on the evil effects of contemporary developments


(parentheses) a pair of round brackets ( ) used to mark off a parenthetical word or phrase: the stage number is added in parentheses to the name or formula
.

2. An interlude or interval:the three months of coalition government were a lamentable political parenthesis.

Phrases
In parenthesis:
1. As a digression or afterthought:
In parenthesis I should say that I am passing quickly over the significance of these matters
2. Shown through punctuation such and grammar such as # , : () [] – through type.

Origin:
Mid 16th century: via late Latin from Greek, from parentithenai 'put in beside'

Grammar:
When something is put ‘in parenthesis’ it is separated off from the main part of the sentence by a pair of brackets, commas, or dashes. This is usually because it contains information or ideas that are not essential to an understanding of the sentence:

With the homeless now crowding the streets of cities that once hardly knew them (like Portland, Oregon), Clinton has effectively criminalized the poor. Or because they form a comment by the author on the rest of the sentence:
The poor, says Clinton (he means blacks and Hispanics), have been ‘demotivated’ by welfare and forced into a ‘welfare’ culture.

Brackets are the most formal (and most obvious) way of showing parenthesis:
With the homeless now crowding the streets of cities that once hardly knew them (like Portland, Oregon), Clinton has effectively criminalized the poor.

Commas are less forceful:
With the homeless now crowding the streets of cities that once hardly knew them, like Portland, Oregon, Clinton has effectively criminalized the poor.

Dashes are the least formal:
With the homeless now crowding the streets of cities that once hardly knew them — like Portland, Oregon — Clinton has effectively criminalized the poor.

Spelling rule:
Make the plural by changing the -is ending to -es: (parentheses).
oxforddictionaries